Posts Tagged ‘ metal ’

In review: The Music of 2012 (part 2)

…continued from yesterday’s post:

Best Metal Album: Testament – The Dark Roots of Earth

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Simultaneous winner of the “pleasant surprise of the year” award, this one snuck up on me. I was thoroughly pleased with 2009’s Formation of Damnation, but I really didn’t expect a comparable follow-up. Like prog, something magical is happening right now in the world of metal, where after a 15 year or so hiatus, the classic bands are artistically relevant again. Unlike prog, there are far fewer “new” bands poised to take over, so I’m not sure how long this can be sustained, but I’ll be thankful for whatever we get. I can’t help but feel like I’m enjoying this album for the wrong reasons, but the shout-along chorus of the opening track “When I say rise up, you say war!” is the perfect blend of awesome and cheesy… like an 80’s action movie (same goes for “True American Hate”). As always, Alex Skolnick’s lead guitars are awe-inspiring, and Chuck Billy’s thrashy shouts and near-death growls are admirable.

Despite my urge to make fun of their lyrics, “Native Blood” is inspiring. It also, notably, was awarded “Best Music Video of the Year” at the Native American Film Festival. Not sure how much competition it had, but then again, the portrayal non-violent confrontation is really something I think all Americans need right now [end of sentimental comments].

Testament also gets bonus points for “Cold Embrace,” as their first catchy ballad since “Return to Serenity”… twenty years ago.

This is also the second appearance of drummer Gene Hoglan on this list. The man is an unfailing ace in the hole for making sure your album is worthwhile. Not only is he on the previously reviewed Epicloud (and other Towsend albums), but he played on Death’s Individual Thought Patterns, aka the most influential death metal album ever… Dark Angel’s well-reviewed but impossible to find pair Darkness Descends and Time Does Not Heal, and provided drums for the fictionally-famous Dethklok.

[More prog]

Anathema Weather Systems

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I’m not sure if the album was meant to be taken this way, but to me, Weather Systems combines the best qualities of the electronic music I listened to in volumes ten years ago, and the ultra-technical prog that dominates my playlists now. I feel especially fortunate to have been shown this album by a friend, because before spring of 2012 I’d never even heard of Anathema. The melodies are so moving that I don’t even care that it’s all in common time and mid-tempo. Plus, when it’s done right, there’s just something so good about an acoustic guitar and a synthesizer playing together. The music straddles the lines between several genres… I could describe parts of it as ambient, chillout, electronica, metal, post-metal, neo-prog, new-prog, and symphonic prog. And I probably missed a few.

The shared vocals between the brothers’ Cavanagh and Lee Douglas are haunting, and stand out as essential to the music in a genre where vocals are frequently treated as an afterthought. Similar to Townsend’s work, some parts of this album get really dense, but its used as an exception rather than a rule, and the songs, while not especially lengthy, are long enough to ease into it. This technique is possibly a relic of Anathema’s origins as a doom metal band.

The highpoint of the album is the nine-minute “The Storm Before the Calm.” It builds tension during the first half (The Storm: “It’s getting colder…”) venturing the furthest into the electronic territory. A fade-out halfway through tricks you into thinking it won’t be resolved, but it lives up to its title. “It ebbs and flows and comes and goes / it eats you up and lets you go.” After sitting out most of the song, Lee Douglas joins adding a beautiful alto line to the final set of lyrics (“Am I still here?”. Notably, while guitarist/vocalist Daniel Cavanagh principally composed the whole album, this piece of melodic genius was written by… the drummer!

Neal Morse – Momentum

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A solo studio album, a super-group, a cover album, and a live album: rest assured Neal will release at least two of them every year. This year, he managed three.

With Momentum, Neal managed his first worthwhile non-concept album. I found last two albums to be a bit disappointing (including his first try at a song-driven album, 2008’s Lifeline), and on learning that he was basically recording this in a rush after plans of a new Transatlantic album fell apart [excuse me while I scream into a pillow], I was braced for more of the same. I was relieved. The music is bright, varied, and as always with Neal, catchy (esp. the title track, “Weathering Sky” and “Freak”). The Christian themes are right where I expected them, but the lyrics have gotten much less praise and worship-y. To steal from a friend, Morse writes incredible melodies with a similar ease and frequency to a bodily function, and it’s nice to know that he can occasionally realize the in a five minute song.

That all being said, about 55% of the album is dominated by the final track, “World Without End.” He’s done better, but there’s plenty to be desired here.

As an added bonus, Randy George’s bass seems to play a more significant role here than in the past (including taking a lead part in the main riff to “Weathering Sky”). Mike Portnoy’s drumming is exactly what it should be. Also, it’s the first worthwhile post-Dream Theater recording Mike Portnoy has appeared on, after the disappointing Flying Colors and artistically-null Omertà.

Honorable Mentions:

Rush – Clockwork Angels; Coheed & Cambria – The Afterman: Ascension; Ian Anderson – Thick As a Brick 2

Best Live Album: Porcupine Tree – Octane Twisted

With this album, Porcupine Tree joins Dream Theater, Opeth, Transatlantic, Marillion, and Rush in an official live release containing the performance of an entire album. This time, it’s 2009’s The Incident, and arguably, it’s better than the studio release. Something about the intricacies of prog sort of demands a live performance of anything that sounds daring on a recording, as kind of a “proof” of musicianship. Let’s just say, Steven Wilson and so come through. The second half of the concert is none too shabby either: in addition to containing most of the second-disc songs from The Incident, it’s got a significant portion of “Anesthetize” and an always-welcome new rendition of “Arriving Somewhere.”

Best Re-release/ Re-Master:

Thick as a Brick, 40th Anniversary edition, with multiple mixes by singer/songwriter/guitarist/engineer/producer/genius/skinny person Steven Wilson.

Biggest Let-downs:

In addition to Flying Colors and Omertà (sorry, Mike Portnoy)… Storm Corrosion. That’s all I’m saying.

Best Christmas Album

I can’t believe I even get to make this a category, but I’ve got to recognize… A Proggy Christmas by the “Prog World Orchestra,” aka Transatlantic in all but name. I’ll never be able to hear “Hark the Herald Angels Sing” again without mentally putting Neal Morse’s voice to it. It’s great to hear musically-intricate takes on Christmas standards… but it makes it all the more frustrating that Transatlantic couldn’t produce an album this year. Let’s have a toast to 2013…

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These Go To Eleven

In the dial-up days when I was just a noob, I ran across a piece of internet banality, listing several individual lines from the Star Wars trilogy, wherein a single word was replaced with the word “pants,” frequently yielding vastly superior results (you listening, Lucas? Next time you change it, add an optional “pants” dub).

Today, at work, while contemplating a playlist for Nigel Tufnel Day (there’s a good chance that link won’t work by the time you get to it), it occurred to me that the same can be done with song titles and lyrics. Here’s what I came up with:

The Clash — Pantsdown

London Pantsing

Excerpt from the lyrics:

But lately one or two has fully paid their due
Working with their pants down
Hut! Git-a-long-git-a-long

2) AC/DC — Back in Pants

…something devoutly to be wished for anyone who’s seen Angus Young lately.

3) Megadeth — Rust in Pants

I was strongly tempted to go with “Pants Sell… But Who’s Buying?”

4) Guns and Roses — Rocket Pants

… a side-effect that kicks in a few hours after satisfying your appetite for destruction.

5) Iron Maiden — The Number of the Pants

6) Led Zeppelin — The Pants Remain the Same

Now really I’m sure I could do a dozen just from this band alone. Custard Pants, When the Pants Break, Babe I’m Gonna Pants You, Pants For One, Achilles’ Last Pants… etc

7) The Beatles — Everybody’s Got Something to Hide Except Me and My Pants

One of the Best Beatles song to blast at eleven.

8 ) Dream Theater — The Pants of Eternity

9) Black Sabbath — Iron Pants

10) The Rolling Stones — Get Off of My Pants

11) Rush — A Farewell to Pants

Check out to the cover to their next album and it becomes apparent they took it literally.

What did you blast at eleven yesterday? What state were your pants in at the time? Let me know in the comments.